That ‘Alien Megastructure’ Star Just Kicked Into Action Again, And Scientists Are Freaking Out

That ‘Alien Megastructure’ Star Just Kicked Into Action Again, And Scientists Are Freaking Out

The strangest star in the universe soon recovered its efforts, researchers reporting that its light began to darken strange – just as it did two years ago when he baffled scientists of their uneven light emissions.

This time, we are witnessing the ongoing research, because over the weekend, astronomers began to run on Twitter, telling everyone: a telescope big enough to agree on the star and help them understand what it’s happening.
In late 2015, a team of astronomers led by Tabetha Boyajian of Yale University noticed something peculiar – a strange light pattern surrounding the star that no one could explain now.

One of the best ways for scientists to locate and study distant stars is to follow the path they emit light – light and glow periodic gaps can reveal the existence of one or more large objects in orbit regularly .

These immersions in brightness are usually very light, stars usually reduce to less than 1% every few days, weeks or months, depending on the size of the orbiting planets.

The 2015 models were so bizarre that they even led a scientist who suggests the possibility of “getting alien” as a Dyson sphere has broken its broadcasts.

“Foreigners should always be the last case you are considering,” said Jason Wright, an astronomer at Pennsylvania State University, in the Atlantic at the time, “but it seemed like something that’s just waiting for an extraterrestrial civilization buildup.”

Others suggested comet swarms, the remaining feces of a devoured planet, or even a scenario in which KIC 8462852 is so deformed, becomes a form that gives it a greater radius at the equator than on poles, but none has been widely Accepted by the scientific community.

The problem was the lack of data – it is more than enough to test or reject the deployment scenarios.

“We embarrassed ourselves in a place where we could do nothing,” Boyajian told the Verge. “We had all the data we could, and to learn more, we had to catch it again.”

Humanity’s ‘doomsday’ seed vault is probably still safe

Humanity’s ‘doomsday’ seed vault is probably still safe

On Friday, a multitude of alarming newsletters emerged

on Svalbard’s Global Seed Vault. Apparently, the water had violated this type of “security” of the planet’s seeds that are supposed to protect the food supply of the earth in the case of a “judgment day” scenario.

The alleged failure of the vault, buried deep in the Arctic slope, occurred after warmer than usual temperatures, which caused the formation of a permafrost layer, “sending cast water that gushes into the entrance tunnel” and Assuming the collection of the world’s most diverse crop seeds at risk, according to the Guardian.

“The seeds of the Arctic fortress of the world flooded after permafrost pétrissement,” the newspaper said.

“Doomsday dome of Arctic Seeds flooded. Thank you, global warming,” said Wired.

Although the water has exceeded the threshold of the vault, no seeds were damaged. However, a spokesman for Statsbygg – a group advising the Norwegian government, which owns the safe – warned that it would be a matter of time before they were.

“A lot of water occurred early in the tunnel, then it froze on the ice, so it was like a glacier when it arrived,” said spokesman Statsbygg, Heja Njaa Aschim in The Guardian of the Water Rape.

Saturday Statsbygg looked back at some of these comments in a statement posted on the secure website. Yes, there was a “water intrusion depending on the season” on the outside of the seed vault, but the group was already taking precautionary measures to improve the external tunnel to prevent future events.

“The seeds in the seed vault were never threatened and will remain safe during the implementation of measures,” the statement said.

According to the statement, proposed improvements include the removal of heat sources such as a transformer station, tunnel and the construction of drainage ditches on the side of the mountain to prevent accumulation of the water melting around the entrance. In addition, the waterproof walls were built inside the tunnel. Finally, being “better than cure” said Statsbygg researchers will monitor the development of permafrost in Svalbard.

“The seeds are safe and sound,” wrote the Crop Trust, an international non-profit group that helped establish Svalbard’s vault in 2008.

So who is it? Is that part of the water leaked in a safe “to safety test” is not serious? Or are we as a human race condemned to die, starve and cross, in case of global catastrophe?

The answer is measured. Representatives of Statsbygg and Crop Trust did not immediately respond to an interview request via e-mail Saturday. However, Confianza crops resumed an article twice in Popular Science magazine on Saturday, which seemed to indicate that the situation was not as serious as initially reported.
“In my experience, it was not the water intrusion into the face of the tunnel every year,” said Cary Fowler, an American farmer who helped create the seed vault. Although he was not in the vault watching the incident, he noted that “flooding” was probably not the most accurate word to describe what happened.

“The tunnel was never designed to be water resistant in the front because I do not think we would need it,” Fowler said in Popular Science. “What happens in the summer, the permafrost melts and the water, and when it goes, it freezes. Usually, it is not far.”

However, this does not mean that the underlying cause of warming of permafrost temperatures – should be ignored.

“At the end of the day, we have to realize that, in a sense, everything is relative to this initiative,” Fowler magazine said. “This whole planet is warming up, and that includes Svalbard.”

Global warming has been particularly notable in Arctic regions, and the melting of permafrost is only one consequence; The other includes the melting of larger glaciers, which could result in a dramatic rise in sea level, as reported by Chris Mooney of the post.

On Friday, a multitude of alarming newsletters emerged on Svalbard’s Global Seed Vault. Apparently, the water had violated this type of “security” of the planet’s seeds that are supposed to protect the food supply of the earth in the case of a “judgment day” scenario.

The alleged failure of the vault, buried deep in the Arctic slope, occurred after warmer than usual temperatures, which caused the formation of a permafrost layer, “sending cast water that gushes into the entrance tunnel” and Assuming the collection of the world’s most diverse crop seeds at risk, according to the Guardian.

“The seeds of the Arctic fortress of the world flooded after permafrost pétrissement,” the newspaper said.

“Doomsday dome of Arctic Seeds flooded. Thank you, global warming,” said Wired.

Although the water has exceeded the threshold of the vault, no seeds were damaged. However, a spokesman for Statsbygg – a group advising the Norwegian government, which owns the safe – warned that it would be a matter of time before they were.

“A lot of water occurred early in the tunnel, then it froze on the ice, so it was like a glacier when it arrived,” said spokesman Statsbygg, Heja Njaa Aschim in The Guardian of the Water Rape.

Saturday Statsbygg looked back at some of these comments in a statement posted on the secure website. Yes, there was a “water intrusion depending on the season” on the outside of the seed vault, but the group was already taking precautionary measures to improve the external tunnel to prevent future events.

“The seeds in the seed vault were never threatened and will remain safe during the implementation of measures,” the statement said.

According to the statement, proposed improvements include the removal of heat sources such as a transformer station, tunnel and the construction of drainage ditches on the side of the mountain to prevent accumulation of the water melting around the entrance. In addition, the waterproof walls were built inside the tunnel. Finally, being “better than cure” said Statsbygg researchers will monitor the development of permafrost in Svalbard.

“The seeds are safe and sound,” wrote the Crop Trust, an international non-profit group that helped establish Svalbard’s vault in 2008.

So who is it? Is that part of the water leaked in a safe “to safety test” is not serious? Or are we as a human race condemned to die, starve and cross, in case of global catastrophe?

The answer is measured. Representatives of Statsbygg and Crop Trust did not immediately respond to an interview request via e-mail Saturday. However, Confianza crops resumed an article twice in Popular Science magazine on Saturday, which seemed to indicate that the situation was not as serious as initially reported.
“In my experience, it was not the water intrusion into the face of the tunnel every year,” said Cary Fowler, an American farmer who helped create the seed vault. Although he was not in the vault watching the incident, he noted that “flooding” was probably not the most accurate word to describe what happened.

“The tunnel was never designed to be water resistant in the front because I do not think we would need it,” Fowler said in Popular Science. “What happens in the summer, the permafrost melts and the water, and when it goes, it freezes. Usually, it is not far.”

However, this does not mean that the underlying cause of warming of permafrost temperatures – should be ignored.

“At the end of the day, we have to realize that, in a sense, everything is relative to this initiative,” Fowler magazine said. “This whole planet is warming up, and that includes Svalbard.”

Global warming has been particularly notable in Arctic regions, and the melting of permafrost is only one consequence; The other includes the melting of larger glaciers, which could result in a dramatic rise in sea level, as reported by Chris Mooney of the post.

Climate change is increasingly turning Antarctica green

Climate change is increasingly turning Antarctica green

The mental image that most of us have of Antarctica is a marked earth gelatin, white as far as the eye can see. But according to new research it might not be the case in the future as the continent becomes more and more green in response to rising temperatures. Researchers at the University of Exeter have taken moss banks of core samples along the Antarctic Peninsula and found that biological activity has increased dramatically in the last 50 years or so.

The study follows the previous work of the team in 2013, which revealed that the warming of the periodic region causes changes in ecology which are largely unprecedented parts. However, although this study focused only on the southern part of the Antarctic Peninsula, this time the team sampled a greater number of sites and found even more consistent results at all times.

“This gives us a much clearer picture of the scale of these changes,” says Matthew Amesbury, lead author of the study. “Previously, we had identified such a response in one place at the southern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, but we now know that moss banks respond to recent climate change across the peninsula.”

The annual average temperatures rising in the region of about 0.5 ° C (0.9 ° F) every decade since the 1950s, the Antarctic peninsula is one of the fastest places on earth. To study the effect it might have on the weakness of plant life calling the continent home, the Exeter team has sampled the basic foam benches. With the deepest sections dating back 150 years, these samples have a detailed picture of biological activity during this period.

As we have seen in the previous study, this biological activity has increased rapidly in the last 50 years. But this time, five samples were taken at three sites – Elephant Island, Ardley Island and Green Island – located 600 km (373 miles). Even at this distance, the samples showed very consistent results, indicating that these changes apply to a much wider area than previously thought.

“The temperature increases in approximately the last half century in the Antarctic Peninsula have had a dramatic effect on foam banks in the region, with a rapid increase in growth and microbial activity,” said Dan Charman, lead researcher of the study. “If this continues, and with increasing amounts of land without permanent ice receding glaciers, the Antarctic Peninsula will be a much greener place in the future.”

In the future, the team plans to expand its study of foam cores for thousands of years to get a long-term picture of Antarctica’s ecology dating back to before human activity begins to have an impact on the climate.

New workout suit by MIT breathes out body’s heat, sweat

New workout suit by MIT breathes out body’s heat, sweat

MIT scientists have designed an exercise suit with breathable ventilation valves that open and close in response to the heat and sweat of an athlete. These components, ranging from the thumbnail image to the size of the fingers align with the microbial cells that shrink and grow in response to changes in living moisture.
The cells act as sensors and small actuators, causing the fins to open when athlete sweat and retains when the body cools.
Researchers have also fabricated a running shoe with an inner layer similar to the flaps of the cells to get out of the air humidity and discharge. Moisture sensitive cells require no additional elements to detect and respond to moisture. The microbial cells they use have also been found to be safe to touch and even to consume.
In the study published in the journal Advances Science, researchers designed moisture-sensitive cells not only to pull open blinds, but also illuminated in response to moisture conditions.
“We can combine our cells with genetic tools to introduce other characteristics of these living cells,” said Wen Wang, a former Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) scientist in the United States.
“We use fluorescence as an example, which allows people to know it again in the dark. In the future, we can combine the aroma release capabilities through genetic engineering. So maybe after after having done The gym, the shirt can release a pleasant odor to the smell, “Wang said.
The researchers first worked with the most common non-pathogenic E. coli strain, which has been shown to swell and shrink in response to changes in moisture.
We then designed the cells to express the green fluorescent protein, which allows the cell to glow when it detects moisture conditions. It then uses a cell printing method that previously developed for E. coli printing on the rough and natural latex sheets.

The team printed parallel lines of E. coli cells on the latex sheets, creating two-layer structures and exposing the tissue to changing wet conditions.
When the tissue was placed on a heating plate for drying, the cells began to reduce, which caused the surface layer of latex to curl. When the tissue is then exposed to vapor, the cells began to glow and expand, causing the elasticity of the latex.
After undergoing 100 wet / dry cycles, Wang said that the fabric had “no dramatic deterioration” either in its cell layer or in its overall performance.
The researchers worked on bio-cloth in a portable garment design of a racing suit with latex fins stamped cells on the back of the suit lined up.
“People may think that heat and sweat are the same, but in fact, some areas like the lower spine produce a lot of sweat, but not a lot of heat,” said Yao Liner, a former student Graduated from MIT.